Tropical forest conservation

Project name:

Operation Wallacea (8)

Project purpose:

Tropical forest conservation

Project activities:

  • animal interaction

  • data collection/analysis

  • habitat restoration/management

  • teaching​

Weekly cost (approx USD):

$

850

Terrestrial

Madagascar

Africa

Direct benefits you gain:

  • data/statistical skills

  • field research skills

  • gain qualification and/or credit

  • remote scenic location

  • undertake your own research

Noteworthy conservation points:

  • development goals (supporting local community)

  • publishes peer-reviewed science

  • publishes work

Accommodation:

When does the project run?

June to August

Facilities:

accommodation included, food included

How long can I stay?

Minimum 2 weeks. Maximum 8 weeks.

Requirements:

Details of the day-to-day life on the project:

**There are many different programs running with opwall for varying amounts of time. The price listed here may change upon further enquiry**

Madagascar boasts some of the most spectacular biodiversity in the world: lemurs, tenrecs, baobabs and over half of all known chameleon species. Much of this biodiversity is endemic. The Operation Wallacea surveys are completing research on the dry forests and associated wetlands of Mahamavo in the northwest of Madagascar.

Madagascar has declared 17% of its land as protected areas, but much of this land is already severely degraded, so the actual area of land under protection is much smaller. An alternative approach to assigning protected area status and prohibiting usage, is to develop community managed areas such as Mahamavo, where there is a mosaic of protected and managed areas. DTZ, the German Technical Support Agency has established a series of community managed forests in the Mahamavo area that appear to be successful and may form the basis for conservation and improving livelihoods in other parts of Madagascar. The Opwall teams here are monitoring how the forest structure and biodiversity in these community managed forests are changing over time to identify whether this management strategy can provide a viable alternative to national parks in terms of protecting biodiversity.

The dry forests around Mahamavo have exceptional diversity with two species of diurnal lemur and another five to six species of nocturnal lemurs, two spectacular species of chameleons, three known species of leaf-tailed geckos, and many endemic birds. In addition to the forest work, the Opwall teams are also documenting the biodiversity value of the adjacent wetlands with a view to getting this area upgraded to Ramsar status (a Ramsar Site is a wetland site designated of international importance under the Ramsar Convention).

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Reviews & ratings

Matt Megill

The previous review I accidentally submitted before I was done. And I want to write the FULL REVIEW:

Diving at Isla del Caño was such a life changing, passion accelerating experience for me. I had done a conservation diving internship in Thailand before this experience, and it felt GREAT to apply those skills and field methods to another part of the world. I had a passion for the ocean before this experience, however this expedition solidified that I need to dedicate my life and career to the ocean and science.

Carlos is truly an inspiration. His fiery passion for the ocean is contagious. He worked really hard to put the experience together with the boat, the dive equipment, and the education. This expedition was a lot of hard work. We woke up really early went on two dives a day. We came back exhausted. But I really can't stress how rewarding the experience was. The fact we were literally advising and providing resources for the rangers protecting the island made me feel like I was making a difference in the world.

This will not be the last Innoexpedition I go on. And I will keep supporting Innoceana and promoting all the work it is doing.

Volunteer

Wasn't finished...

Matt Megill

Diving at Isla del Caño was such a life changing, passion accelerating experience for me. I had done a conservation diving internship in Thailand before this experience, and it felt GREAT to apply those skills and field methods to another part of the world. I had a passion for the ocean before this experience, however this expedition solidified that I need to dedicate my life and career to the ocean and science.

Carlos is truly an inspiration. His firey He worked really hard to put the experience together with the boat, the dive equipment, and the education. This expedition was a lot of hard work. We woke up really early went on two dives a day. We came back exhausted. But I really can't stress how rewarding the experience was. The fact we were literally kind of advising and providing resources for the rangers protecting the island made me feel like I was making a difference in the world.

Volunteer

An Experience of a Lifetime